Category Archives: Health Advice

Wine and Bloods Night

Melbourne Rabbit Clinic celebrates an evening of getting to know your pet’s blood better Recently Melbourne Rabbit Clinic has been updating our medical protocols in regards to haematology – the study of our patients’ blood.  With the help of Dr Brad Galgut from ASAP veterinary pathology labs, and the donation of blood from some of our own (less than thrilled) bunnies and piggies, we have been

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Vaccination Shortages and the K5 Release

This month marks the beginning of the Australian Government’s release of the K5 strain of RHDV, the virus most commonly known as calicivirus.  As previously mentioned in our coverage of the changing landscape of calicivirus strains present in Australia, K5 is an RHDVa strain, a form of virus similar to our original RHDV1 strain of calicivirus, which was introduced to control the wild rabbit

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Further developments in calicivirus vaccination protocols in Australia

Over the last few years there have been some developments in the strains of calicivirus and calicivirus-like viruses in Australia.  Due to the confusing nature of these new viruses and the general lack of information on their prevalence in Australia there has been a large amount of confusion, particularly regarding vaccinations and protective measures for pet rabbits.  In the interest of keeping all of

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Calicivirus Updates: Dispelling the Myths

Calicivirus (Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease Virus, or RHDV) is one of two viruses present in Australia in order to control the wild population of rabbits.  The first strain of RHDV was introduced in the mid-90s from the Czech Republic (this was RHDV1 V351), and since its original introduction has been diversifying and evolving in the wild.  As a result many wild rabbits have immunity to

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Head-tilts and Holidays

An update on our E. cuniculi policy and all the end of year news As new veterinary studies are published and more information is discovered, the Melbourne Rabbit Clinic is updating our medical protocol regarding treating and preventing E. cuniculi.  This parasite can cause diseases to the central nervous system, eyes and kidneys in affected rabbits. We are also excited to announce that our clinic’s three

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Summer Bugs

Flies, mozzies and other nasties The start of summer has been warm and wet, which is unfortunately is perfect weather for nasty bugs.  This means that we are seeing a lot of flystrike at the moment. Flystrike occurs when flies are attracted to abnormal smells (urine, faeces or damp skin) and lay their eggs in the rabbit or guinea pig’s coat.  These eggs hatch into

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Summer is Coming

The importance of heat avoidance October heat has hit Melbourne over the last week, and we have already heard lots of stories of toasty buns (and piggies).  As the weather warms up we just want to remind everyone that our little furry friends are not as good at dealing with the heat as we are.  While we can strip down to our undies and

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Dental Month at Melbourne Rabbit Clinic

It’s time to check out those ever-growing smiles Dental Month at Melbourne Rabbit Clinic has arrived, and is running all through September and to the end of October.  Our little furry friends have constantly growing teeth, and for many bunnies and guinea pigs regular check-ups are important to ensure that they are still growing at the right angles.  Poor (low hay) diet, genetics and

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Senior Month- having geriatric pets

GETTING OLDER Caring for the elderly rabbit or guinea pig… So your little furry friend is getting older… As with any older animals, geriatric critters require an increase in hands on care and observation. Rabbits and guinea pigs are very good at hiding any signs of illness and hence it is important to spend plenty of time with you bunny or piggie to notice

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Health update: Flystrike!

With flies being prominent in the warmer and humid season, unwell outside rabbits are at risk of flystrike. Flies are attracted to rabbits with urine scald, faecal scald, weepy eyes and discharging wounds. Flies lay their eggs on the soiled or wet fur and maggots hatch within 12 hours. Maggots can release a form of local anaesthetic numbing the area and thus cause a

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